ROA Motorcycles BMW R80

BMW R80 by ROA Motorcycles

ROA Motorcycles BMW R80

BMW is one of the only main moto brands that has never graced The Bullitt garage. Sure we've had some opportunities to snag one but for whatever reason, it just never happened. And that's not to say we have wanted one. Or lusted after many... There is just something so visceral and pure about the horizontally opposed boxer engine configuration. The sound, the vibrations, the subtle pull to the side when accelerating off the line. It all just speaks to me. Vintage and modern BMWs are both rad in their own rights but lately I just can't seem to get enough of the vintage varietal. Take this BMW R80 by ROA Motorcycles for example. Not sure if it's the striking blue paint on the tank or the scrumptious rich brown in the amaretta wrapped custom seat, but there is just something about this Bavarian cafe racer that makes me stare and drool.

ROA Motorcycles BMW R80

Obviously, stripping the bike down was a starting point. The ROA team but their own custom rear subframe and I love the little step in the back. As mentioned above, the seat is wrapped in an "amaretta" material - I had to look it up - which is a microfiber material that is said to have a feel that is smoother than suede, a high-quality appearance, and a soft and supple texture. From the looks of it, we're sold!

Aside from the tank and seat, nearly every surface was blacked out aside from some raw steel accents here and there. The forks were dropped by 20% and with the pared down instrument cluster and the addition of clip-ons, the business end of the machine looks simple and clean.

I mean, did I mention that I'm in love with this tank color?! It's so damn good!

The simple front end, stubby mudguards, and knobby Heidenau K60's complete this build for a handsome and capable urban brawler. I can picture is roaming the streets of ROA's native Madrid, Spain but can also equally imagine it pulling up to Deus Ex Machina in trendy Venice, CA as well. Wherever this R80 roams, it will be right at home.

Specs:

- Model: BMW R80 RT
- Engine: BMW black powder coated
- Rims: BMW black powder coated
- Tires: Heidenau K60
- Brakes: Metallic hoses
- Front fork: Lowered 20%
- Headlight: CLUBMAN
- RMC / 40mm springs
- Speedometer: KOSO (analog / digital)
- Brake pumps: 1/2 NISSIN
- Subframe: Custom ROA unit
- Seat: ROA artisan seat with amaretta upholstery
- Rear fender: Handmade in steel
- Renthal "ultra low" handlebar
- Rear suspension Black springs
- Mufflers: Dual Escapes Megaton
- MINI circle LED indicators
- INOX screws
- BMW Aluminum Emblems
- LED taillight / brake, position, license plate light
- Modified 5cm BMW turrets
- Clip on CLBD mirrors
- Biltwell heat-resistant tape
- CR clutch control with air puller
- Adjustable 42mm headlight support

ROA BMW cafe racer

ROA Motorcycles: Web | Facebook | Instagram


Alex Earle

Behind the Bars with Alex Earle

Alex Earle or Earle Motors

Welcome back to another installment of Behind The Bars, The Bullitt’s celebration of the humans behind the machines we love. If you are a regular reader of this column you know we are generally bullish on the overall state of affairs within the moto industry simply because, well, we’re like you and are addicted to the sound, smell and sensation of riding. Plus, The Bullitt is located in SoCal which feels like the epicenter of motorcycle culture – we tend to only see the good and ignore the haters, industry articles and social media mentions about the flatlining of the motorcycle industry. Recently, we decided it would be fun to profile some of the people who inspire us, challenge our point of view on design, or in some cases, just one up themselves and the industry as a whole.

For our next feature, we’ve chosen an amazingly creative, soft spoken, and wildly talented Alex Earle of Earle Motors. By day, Alex works in the Audi design department and teaches motorcycle design at Art Center College in Pasadena, CA. He also runs Earle Motors, a custom motorcycle company where in addition to building some badass bikes, he makes functional components like his popular swingarm extenders for Ducati Scramblers. I've gotten to know Alex personally over the years, starting with my time at Ducati. He is genuinely such a nice guy and his passion for design and motorsports is undeniable. We honored to share a little about Alex, and happy to have you here reading this. Without further ado, here's Mr. Alex Earle!

 

The Alaskan custom Ducati Scrambler by Alex Earle of Earle Motors
The Alaskan custom Ducati Scrambler by Earle Motors

Name: Alex Earle

Company: Earle Motors

Tell us a little about yourself. Maybe a fun fact or something not commonly known.
I have a sweet tooth. If i buy a bag of Oreos, I am eating the whole bag of Oreos (sometimes in one sitting). My family gets nothing.

Where are you from, and where do you live now?
Salt Lake City, Utah now living in Thousand Oaks, CA.

What do you do for a living?
I work in the Audi design department and teach motorcycle design at Art Center College in Pasadena.

Ducati Desert Sled comp by Alex Earle
Ducati Desert Sled comp by Alex Earle

What was the first bike you bought and why did you buy it?
BMW R75/5 I like the industrial look of the engine and classic styling. Good traveler too.

1970 BMW R75/5

What one person has influenced your interest in these machines - what about them helped form your ideas on this sport?
Hard to select just one honestly - John Britten for his combination of resolve and naïveté. Intuitive engineering skill and ability to synthesize amazing solutions of pure inspiration

You just found out you have one week to live. That gives you a few days to squeeze in 1-2 days of riding. What bike, and where do you go?
That's intense! Quick rip on my 501 on some Colorado single track and then rush back to my family- I mean 1 week?!

What’s a life lesson you learned from motorcycles?
Accountability to yourself and the will to see things through

Have motorcycles helped you discover some aspect of your personality and/or have they helped you understand your purpose?
I started seriously cycling when I was 12 or 13. I've spent countless hours alone in the saddle over the years. Motorcycles have extended that for me. I think my personality is well suited for motorcycles but I don't feel they help me understand my purpose.

You have $10k and one hour to buy a bike…. Go.
I'd get a KTM 990 Adventure R

KTM 990 Adventure R

When you're not wrenching or riding, what else keeps you busy these days?
I have a 1 year old daughter named Alma so..... that's about it! And my day job, and Art Center.

Gear is a big part of this sport, what is one thing you cannot live without when riding?
I always carry a Leatherman carbon Skeletool.

Name a designer (or individual), not in the moto space, that influences your work.
Burt Rutan- Scaled Composites

Any previous builds or projects that you're proud of, or surprised with public perception?
Very proud of the original tracker monocoque. It's very comfortable and i think it's beautiful. I was surprised by how much attention the one piece design received.

Ducati Monster by Alex Earle
The original Earle Motors tracker monocoque

Custom Ducati Monster by Alex Earle

Any cool projects/builds you're currently working on?
I just assembled a tracker monocoque for myself on a Ducati S4RS chassis so that has been incredibly satisfying to take to the track.

The newest carbon-clad tracker monocoque on a Ducati S4RS

What's next for you? What project has your attention?
Also sourced a Harley Davidson LiveWire for my first electric experience.

You're editing your own moto video - footage of you riding with best friends. What song opens the video?

We're in this industry because it brings us joy. What was your most joyous day on a motorcycle to date?
Yesterday I was at Willow Springs with a Ducati Testastretta and an electric Harley. Both were so rewarding to ride and the weather was perfect. Spent the day with truly great friends that I don't get to see often and pushed the bikes onto the trailer as the sun went down. I was the last person at the track. The quiet after the days commotion was fantastic. Perfect day.

Extra Credit #1 - This industry is small, so give a shout out to a few people who are doing something unique, interesting or worth copying.
Brady Walker, Ramming Speed Racing WLF Enduro.

Extra Credit #2 - Please nominate one additional personal that you think we should feature in "Behind the Bars". Bonus points for females.
Mesa Lange

Earle Motors: Online | Instagram | Facebook

Here's a great video by Petrolicious about Alex with his killer 67 Jeep Commando and his 94 Ducati Monster.


Behind the Bars with Hugo Eccles

Industrial design meets moto art

Welcome back to another installment of Behind The Bars, The Bullitt’s celebration of the humans behind the machines we love. If you are a regular reader of this column you know we are generally bullish on the overall state of affairs within the moto industry simply because, well, we’re like you and are addicted to the sound, smell and sensation of riding. Plus, The Bullitt is located in SoCal which feels like the epicenter of motorcycle culture – we tend to only see the good and ignore the haters, industry articles and social media mentions about the flatlining of the motorcycle industry. Recently, we decided it would be fun to profile some of the people who inspire us, challenge our point of view on design, or in some cases, just one up themselves and the industry as a whole.

For our fifth feature, we’ve chosen British ex-pat, Hugo Eccles. Eccles is co-founder and design director of Untitled Motorcycles, a company based in San Francisco and London that designs and builds custom motorcycles for both private clients and factory brands like Ducati, Moto Guzzi, Triumph, Yamaha and Zero. I've had the pleasure of working with Hugo on some of his famous builds while I was on marketing teams at for many of the brands listed above. Seeing his Hyper Scrambler roll onto Ducati Island - then appear on Jay Leno - was cool to be behind the scenes on. When I was at Moto Guzzi, I selected Hugo as one of four "V9 Pro Builders" and saw him crank out his V9 Fat Tracker that shared similar vibe of the Hyper Scrambler, and was certainly one of the more unique builds we saw on that program. I also got to see his ‘Supernaturale’, a customized 1975 Moto Guzzi 850T beat 300+ entrants to win the Design & Style Award at the Quail Motorcycle Gathering 2017. Safe to say this dude can build.

Custom Moto Guzzi by Hugo Eccles
Untitled's Supernaturale. Photo: Erik Jutras.

Aside from being a motorcycle builder, Eccles is also a professor of industrial design. His background in industrial design clearly has an influence on his motorcycle designs. Hugo has a very clean and minimalist approach to his builds and often pines over minute details. On his builds, something like a simple switch or starter button might get revisited and revised countless times. To some this exercise might seem excessive. To Hugo, it's just the way he operates.

Eccles’ most recent build the ZERO XP (pictured below) is an experimental electric motorcycle that explores the future of motorcycles by taking a first-principles design approach. Before we jumped into our standard questions, we had a few extra for Hugo on his XP.

Zero XP by Hugo Eccles
Zero XP by Hugo Eccles. Photo: Aaron Brimhall.

Name: Hugo Eccles

Company: Design Director, Untitled Motorcycles

Can you share a little on the modern/minimal design aesthetic on the XP?

I think the simpler aesthetic reflects the simpler mechanics of an electric. An electric motorcycle has about one fifth of the part count of a combustion motorcycle. A pared-down aesthetic comes naturally since there’s just fundamentally fewer things that are required to make the motorcycle function – no gas tank, no carburetors, no radiator, no exhaust. It’s an opportunity to minimize the distance between the rider and the riding experience. I’m a big fan of Lotus Cars founder Colin Chapman’s saying “simplify and add lightness” which I apply to gasoline and electric builds alike.

Will you share your thoughts on on how electric will be more about IoT/AI fused with design?

Although on the surface a small difference, the addition of modern UI (user interface), UX (digital user experience) and IoT (internet of things) to a motorcycle has huge implications. The addition of technology fundamentally changes the essence of the motorcycle, making it simultaneously both analog and digital. No longer is the motorcycle just an inert machine but almost ‘alive’ with the ability to predict, anticipate and recognize. It will change the nature of motorcycling.

Hugo Eccles custom Zero Motorcycle
Photo: Aaron Brimhall

What are your thoughts on the new trend towards custom electric bikes?

Our ideas of motorcycles are based on the history and the physical constraints of the internal combustion engine. With the introduction of electric those constraints and those ‘rules’ disappear. An electric motorcycle doesn’t need any of those traditional combustion elements – tank, exhaust, and so on - but still designers resist the opportunity. Interestingly, it’s no longer a limitation of technology but, instead, a limitation of confidence, of belief. We, and the industry, can rewrite the rules if we choose to believe we can rewrite the rules.

What you see the design future of motorbikes looking like through the lens of electric?

I believe the future of motorcycling is full of exciting possibilities and perplexing challenges. I’m interested to play an active role in navigating and steering how motorcycles and the motorcycle industry navigate and respond to nurturing new users, new riders’ safety concerns, issues around integrating with autonomy, and incorporating things like on-demand market models. I’m currently consulting on a number of those issues. 

OK - now to get to know you a little better, let's get to the Behind the Bars questions.

  1. What was the first bike you bought and why did you buy it?

My first motorcycle was a Yamaha TZR125. In the UK, where I’m originally from, you can ride small capacity motorcycles on your car license. I bought it when I was twenty one and rode it everywhere for four years until I got my full motorcycle license and traded it for a Kawasaki ZXR400.

Yamaha TZR125
A Yamaha TZR125
  1. What’s a life lesson you learned from motorcycles?

- Don’t worry about the corner you’re in, concentrate on the next corner. Don’t look at the road beneath you but at the road ahead. There’s a life lesson in there somewhere.

- Always cover your brakes. (hahaha)

  1. What one person has influenced your interest in these machines - what about them helped form your ideas on this sport?

My most significant influence has to be the first petrolhead in my life - my Dad. He was an amateur racer who would take me and my mum to the track when I was a baby. The first car I remember was a white Sunbeam Tiger which was a perfectly usable Sunbeam Alpine that some guy called Carroll Shelby had transplanted a Ford V8 into. It was the precursor to the AC Cobra - another small British car with a huge American engine. We lived in the English countryside so my dad would commute to London on his orange Suzuki GS250 dressed in a full suit and tie underneath his waterproof coveralls - very cool and ‘James Bond’ to my impressionable mind.

A 1964 Sunbeam Tiger.
A 1964 Sunbeam Tiger
  1. Have motorcycles helped you discover some aspect of your personality and/or have they helped you understand your purpose?

I find riding a very calm and serene, almost zen-like, experience. It’s a form of therapy for me. Although it appears loud and frenetic on the outside it’s very peaceful at the center of the storm. That’s even more pronounced with an electric motorcycle where the calmer experience allows you to have a surprisingly different relationship with nature. Riding the XP in the canyons above San Francisco I’ve seen deer, coyote and wild turkey that would have normally disappeared long before my arrival.

Hugo Eccles custom Zero XP electric motorcycle
Eccles in action. Photo: Aaron Brimhall
  1. This industry is small, so give a shout out to a few people who are doing something unique, interesting or worthwhile.

The first shout out has to be a general ‘hello’ to my fellow builders – you’ll never meet a greater group of people. As a motorcycle designer, I like to confound expectations so I appreciate people who do the same. Designing classically beautiful motorcycles is relatively ‘easy’ from a design perspective because there are well-established rules of proportion, and so on. I appreciate people who have the courage to step outside of the status quo and beat their own path. In that vein I’d have to shout out to Karl Renoult aka Ed Turner and Dave from Death Spray Custom. There are definitely others who also deserve a mention.

Ed Turner's Suzuki GSX1100
Ed Turner's Suzuki GSX1100
  1. Gear is a big part of this sport, what is one thing you cannot (NOT) live without when riding?

For me the biggest two would be helmet and gloves, probably because my professions (industrial design and motorcycle design) depend on both. Also, can you imagine how complicated hands are to rebuild?!

  1. You just found out you have one week to live. That gives you a few days to squeeze in 1-2 days of riding. What bike and where do you go?

If I had only a week to live I’d probably ride a bike I’m very familiar with. The Hyper Scrambler is a bike I built four years ago and has been my daily driver since then. It just can’t be beat on Canyon roads. Otherwise I’d love to ride a Britten V1000. What John Britten achieved twenty five years ago was amazing then and remains so today. I’ve seen a few of the ten remaining examples and they’re exquisite looking and the handling is supposed to be without compare. As for the ‘where’ I’d have to pick Italy, specifically the island of Sardinia. You can’t equal the combination of stunning roads, beautiful villages, and breathtaking landscape.

Hugo Eccles custom Hyper Scrambler
Untitled Motorcycles' Hyper Scrambler. Photo: Erik Jutras
  1. You have $10k and one hour to buy a bike…. Go.

I had to think about this one for a while. 

I considered new bikes that I could afford with that budget but none of them excite me. In my three decades of motorcycling I’ve owned, and almost-owned, some great bikes which with $10K burning a hole in my pocket I’d revisit. In no particular order, they are:

- Kawasaki ZXR400. My first ‘proper’ bike once I got my full motorcycle license. Lightweight, fast, looked great in limited-edition metallic burgundy, and those inlet tubes!.

- Suzuki GSX-R400. The one that got away. I almost bought a grey market version that had been imported from Japan to the UK. It looked like a beautiful silver shark. I still regret not buying it.

- Ducati 748. Probably the best bike I’ve ever owned. Light, powerful, and handled beautifully. Near-perfect weight distribution that always felt nimble yet planted. Just awesome, and one of the prettiest bikes ever penned by the late great Massimo Tamburini (ok, with the exception of the MV Agusta V4 Oro).

Ducati 748 by Ludovic Petitfrere
Ducati 748. Photo: Ludovic Petitfrere
  1. What motorcyclist do you identify with and why? Ponch, The Fonz, or Evel Knievel.

I’d have to pick Evel Knievel. Growing up in England I had an Evel Knievel toy which fascinated me. It was my first introduction to Americana and probably seeded my desire to emigrate across the Pond.

Evel in action
  1. When normal people (the ones who drive around in cages) ask you why you ride a machine that is so dangerous, what do you tell them?

Well, first, no-one gets out alive so the idea that you can somehow cheat death is a dangerous conceit in itself. Many things in life are potentially dangerous so it’s a matter of outlook, I suppose. Everything has a risk. You could choke and die on breakfast cereal. There’s not really anything else like riding a motorcycle. It feels like an extension of your body so everything is very immediate and you’re connected to your environment in a way you’re not in a car- you feel the wind, changes in temperature, the smell of the plants and trees.

  1. Name a designer, not in the moto space, that influences your POV on your moto-designs.

I’m going to cheat and name two. First is Marcello Gandini who designed the Lamborghini Muira, Lamborghini Countach, Lancia Stratos, and so many other amazing cars. The clarity of purpose of Gandini’s work was - and still is - extraordinary. I recently visited the Museo Alfa Romeo and saw his 1968 Alfa Carabo in person. Although designed half a century ago, its audacity still puts most modern supercars to shame. The other is Colin Chapman of Lotus Cars whose mantra ‘simplify and add lightness” has become a mantra of my own.

1968 Alfa Romeo Carabo Concept
Marcello Gandini's 1968 Alfa Romeo Carabo Concept

Well, thanks Hugo. Great getting to hear a little more about your background and what makes you tick. Keep those creative juices flowing and we'll keep our eyes peeled for what's next from Untitled.

Untitled Motorcycles: Web | Facebook | Instagram


MV Agusta Dragster 800RR Urban Scrambler by Rough Crafts

A murdered-out Dragster 800RR

MV Agustas are rarely lacking in the styling department, even straight off the showroom floor. Italian brands typically all focus more on aesthetics than other manufacturers and MV often has more flair than their brethren. That being said, Winston Yeh of Rough Crafts knew he would be able to improve on the already handsome Dragster 800RR.

MV Agusta Dragster 800RR by Rough Crafts

This build was commissioned by MV Agusta Taiwan, with a simple (but not easy) task: once completed, it still had to look like it could be a production machine. Yeh didn't know it when he started, but this project coincidentally happened during the same time MV launched it's own RVS program. For those of you unfamiliar, the (RVS) or “Reparto Veicoli Speciali” is MV's new Special Vehicles Operations department that launched in 2019 with the first bike being a reinterpretation of the MV Agusta Dragster. Maybe they were able to pull a few notes out of the pages of Rough Craft's book.

MV Agusta Dragster 800RR by Rough Crafts

This is the first build for Rough Crafts where they had to work with existing components. Winston admitted that it was still quite the challenge.

"I have to admit it's equal challenging to make sure the design works with the pieces, and still make a new concept statement." - Winston Yeh

 

MV Agusta Dragster 800RR by Rough Crafts

Kicking off the project, Winston instantly decided the Dragster 800RR need to go an "urban scrambler" route based on the fact MV wouldn't make sense for their usual "Guerilla" philosophy. New Pirelli MT60RS provided a perfect scrambler vibe without giving up street performance, that were wrapped in the same wheels made for their Ballistic Trident by Wukawa. Have you seen their Ballistic Triddent by the way? That this is a killer modern day dustbin racer.

Upgraded Beringer brakes provide all the necessary stopping power for the 800RR. The headlight he ran isn't too dissimilar from the stock unit but has a bit more enduro feel. The slimmed down tail give a bit of tracker inspiration and cleans up the whole look.

When comparing a side by side of the Rough Crafts against the stock Dragster 800RR, it's not wildly altered. That being said, it IS slimmed down, cleaned up, murdered out AND looks like it could have rolled off the Varese production floors. So, that being considered, I'd say mission accomplished.

Specs

  • Year / Model: 2015 MV Agusta Dragster 800RR
  • Engine Make / Size: MV Agusta/798cc
  • Front End Make / Type: Stock blacked out
  • Rear Shock: Gears Racing
  • Exhausts: HP Corse "Hydro-Tre" black
  • Wheels F: Rough Crafts x Wukawa Industry "VGP-6" style / 17 x 3.50"
  • Wheels R: Rough Crafts x Wukawa Industry "VGP-6" style / 17 x 6.00"
  • Tires F: Pirelli MT60RS 120/70 ZR 17
  • Tires R: Pirelli MT60RS 180/55 ZR 17
  • Brakes F: Rough Crafts/Beringer one-off
  • Brakes R: Beringer
  • Painter: Air Runner Custom Paint
  • Chroming / Plating: Anodizing
  • Assembly: CT-Garage
  • Sheetmetal: MS Pro
  • Gauge: stock
  • Foot controls: stock
  • Handlebars: ACCEL Pro bars
  • Handlebar controls: stock / Beringer
  • Headlight: Rough Crafts
  • Taillight: Rough Crafts
  • Bar-end turn signals: Motogadget
  • Seat/Tail Section: Rough Crafts
  • Mirror: Motogadget
  • Gas caps: CNC Racing
  • Risers: Rough Crafts
  • Grips: Motogadget
  • Rear sprocket/nuts kit: AEM Factory

Rough Crafts: Online | Facebook | Instagram | Photos by JL Photography


Epic Moto Video - The Seeker featuring Pol Tarrés

Moto Inspiration

There's no doubt it's been a strange year. Scratch that - it's been a shit year. With virtually all motorcycle events, rides and rallies canceled we've been chomping at the bit for some excitement in the motorcycle community. We need some inspiration and something we can digitally consume and mentally get away from lockdowns, politics, social unrest and all the madness going on around the world.

Sure, it's great to have MotoGP and World SBK back, and Long Way Up is finally releasing, but other than that, there hasn't been much excitement in the moto space this year. Recently, Spanish directors, the Echevarria Brothers, released a short film featuring rider Pol Tarrés who absolutely goes bananas on a Yamaha Teneré 700. It's so well shot, well produced, and Pol seriously does things on that bike that made my jaw drop. No question it was the inspiration we needed and I'm certainly eyeing my stable and noticing a hole in the shape of a lightweight ADV bike staring back at me.

The Seeker Motorcycle Video

Copy below by The Who Project

After the success of the Hebo Dominicana video last winter, The Who crew is more than excited to present The Seeker, a new short movie about motorcycles, dreamy locations and impossible tricks by the giant Pol Tarrés.

The Seeker in another short film directed by the Echevarria Brothers (The Who) and presented by Kriega, the very best possible luggage options for motorcyclists and RDX, motorcycle goggles designed in Australia. The Seeker is the fourth episode of the Beyond the Wheels motorcycle series and supported by many other brands that believe in the project since the very beginning.

The Seeker Motorcycle Video

It’s no secret that Pol Tarrés and The Who are such a great team and they love the big challenges. Creativity flows when they are together. Thinking “out the box” is a standard that moves the crew since they meet each other. I remember this words from Pol before having the bike in his hands, “Javi, trust me, people have no idea what I’m capable of on the Teneré 700. It will be mind blowing for them”.

The Seeker Motorcycle Video Pol Tarrés

Thanks to Yamaha, with the introduction of those lighter Adventure motorcycles like the Teneré 700, we open our eyes and see the endless opportunities that Adventure riding could be for us and what could be in the future. It’s true that Pol has amazing skills from trials and extreme enduro like no other but inspiring and dreaming has always define us. Because we are all dreamers, this short film is a tribute to all of those who dream, too.

The Seeker Motorcycle Video Pol Tarrés

The Seeker is about getting to nowhere investigating miles into the unknown. No rules, no destination but learning about yourself on the journey. Then you probably find where your limits are.

The Seeker Motorcycle Video Pol Tarrés

Ride today because future is uncertain. THE SEEKER.

Produced by The WHO
Starring Pol Tarrés
Still photography by Javi Echevarria
Filmed by Mitiyu Echevarria


Behind the Bars with Robert Pandya

Welcome back to the fourth installment of Behind The Bars, The Bullitt’s celebration of the humans behind the machines we love. If you are a regular reader of this column you know we are generally bullish on the overall state of affairs within the moto industry simply because, well, we’re like you and are addicted to the sound, smell and sensation of riding. Plus, The Bullitt is located in SoCal which feels like the epicenter of motorcycle culture – we tend to only see the good and ignore the haters, industry articles and social media mentions about the flatlining of the motorcycle industry. Recently, we decided it would be fun to profile some of the people who inspire us, challenge our point of view on design, or in some cases, just one up themselves and the industry as a whole.

For our fourth feature, we’ve chosen a man that has an incredible passion for the motorcycle industry, Robert Pandya. Robert is a huge fan of powersports, the motorcycle industry and the people involved. He might be one of the biggest advocates for motorcycling out there! Mix that with a MacGyver skill-set that includes podcast host, event management, experiential and marketing ideation, PR, photography / videography, co-promotional relationships, copy and advertising writing, and a general love of the creative, it's clear that Robert Pandya sits at the crossroads of enthusiasm and business in the motoverse. Robert often has his hands in multiple projects, personal builds and adventures. He's a great guy to know and his enthusiasm for life is infectious in the best way. We need more folks like Robert in this industry! Without further ado, let's get to it.

Name: Robert Pandya

Company: Owner - SpokesPeople LLC

Tell us a little about yourself. Maybe a fun fact or something not commonly known.
I’m sentimental for old things. Past girlfriends (the good times) and I have every card my mom ever sent me. I love biscuits with butter and honey. Motorcycles carry the power of joy, the weight of heartache and the promise of the unknown.

Where are you from, and where do you live now?
Born in Scotland. Raised in Illinois. Escaped to Texas in 1987.

What the rest of us are missing not living in Texas

What do you do for a living?
Slave to authentic creativity around things with throttles. PR. Events. Spokesperson. Producer.

Robert Pandya working "Discover the Ride"
Pandya working the "Discover the Ride" during last year's IMS tour

What was the first bike you bought and why did you buy it?
1986 Suzuki GN 250. Black with a Red and Orange pinstripe. Could not afford a car, somehow talked my dad into co-signing.

What one person has influenced your interest in these machines - what about them helped form your ideas on this sport?
Literally nobody. It’s all self-driven. Though Matt LeBlanc brought me to his ranch and ignited my continuing love of riding off-road.

Photo: TeamCoco

You just found out you have one week to live. That gives you a few days to squeeze in 1-2 days of riding. What bike, and where do you go?
I’d ride with my brother and sister. I don’t care on what. Hopefully in the Rockies, but Sis gets to pick.

Photo: ADV Pulse

What’s a life lesson you learned from motorcycles?
That emotions can have a throttle. That mistakes will happen. That motorcycles have a power to unite, but motorcyclists often fail that opportunity.

Have motorcycles helped you discover some aspect of your personality and/or have they helped you understand your purpose?
That the wrench is as powerful as the ride. But not everyone is perfect at both. Gotta know where your strengths are and not fear asking for help.

You have $10k and one hour to buy a bike…. Go.
First check online for local Ducati Sport Classics. If none, then a decent Trials bike. Never had one of those.

Probably got getting a "LE" for $10k

When you're not wrenching or riding, what else keeps you busy these days?
Got a dog. I’m apparently going to be single forever, so that’s an ongoing project. And I own a classic Fiat 124 Spider. That shit breaks down.

Robert Pandya and dog
Sami, Robert, and Bear Butte

Gear is a big part of this sport, what is one thing you cannot live without when riding?
A charged cell phone.

Name a designer (or individual), not in the moto space, that influences your work.
Don Rickles.

Any previous builds or projects that you're proud of, or surprised with public perception?
The Spirit of Munro. The Black Hills Beast. Elnora. My old racing Hawk GT.

Spirit of Munro - Indian Robert Pandya
Photo: Cruiser Magazine

Any cool projects/builds you're currently working on?
Custom Zero FX. Custom TW200. That goddamn Fiat.

Robert Pandya's custom Zero FX tracker
Robert's “Sunset Tracker” at the Buffalo Chip

What's next for you? What project has your attention?
Got an idea for a brand, an idea for an agency and an idea for events. Maybe all at the same time.

You're editing your own moto video - footage of you riding with best friends. What song opens the video?
Currently: Intro by The XX

We're in this industry because it brings us joy. What was your most joyous day on a motorcycle to date?
It hasn’t happened yet.

Extra Credit - This industry is small, so give a shout out to a few people who are doing something unique, interesting or worth copying.
Nathan Baron - Gen Z Biker. Allan Lane. Todd Egan. Todd Williams Photography. Brian Brown - Fate and Fervor

Anything important we forgot to ask, or anything else you want to add?
Enthusiasts can save this industry if non-enthusiast senior managers would get the hell out of the way. We won’t fail you - just give us room.

Robert Pandya: Online | Facebook | Instragram | AllKidsBike.org


Zero XP by Untitled Motorcycles

Zero XP by Untitled Motorcycles

Future forward design

Hugo Eccles has graced the digital pages here on multiple occasions - and he has with so many other motorcycle and design outlets. Eccles is co-founder and design director of Untitled Motorcycles, a design company that creates and builds custom motorcycles for private clients and for factory brands such as Ducati, Triumph, Yamaha, and Zero.

With an impressive industrial design career and background, Eccles has a unique eye and an accompanying borderline scary attention to detail. Untitled Motorcycles was founded in 2010, by Hugo Eccles in San Francisco and his his business partner, Adam Kay, nearly 5,000 miles away in London, England. Over the last 10 years, the both locations have produced some solid customs but the San Francisco workshop has put out some of the most immaculate and interesting custom motorcycle designs worldwide.

Recently, Hugo turned his focus to electric motorcycles, partnering with Zero Motorcycles and has created a masterpiece of future-forward design with his Zero XP.

The Future

Zero Xp by Hugo Eccles

The Zero XP is a new type of electric motorcycle, one that discards conventions and defies expectations. Developed without compromise and built with precision, the XP combines cutting-edge design with state-of-the-art technology, representing a new era of motorcycling.

The Experience

Zero XP Zero Motorcycle

The Zero XP doesn’t look like a conventional motorcycle because it isn’t a conventional motorcycle.

The Zero XP produces almost double the torque of a super bike, delivered linearly and continuously. Minimal, aerodynamic bodywork supports the rider and directs airflow over the motorcycle. Controlling all the incredible power, and keeping the Zero XP planted, is a state-of-the-art safety system.

The onboard ride computer offers for standard and ten individualized ride modes. Ride modes are switchable on-the-fly, transforming the Zero XP from a cruiser on the highways to a super moto in the twists.

The Cockpit

Zero XP custom dash by Hugo Eccles

The Zero XP features beautifully minimal and completely functional controls. Anything that distracts from the riding experience has been removed.

Primary Display: Speedometer - see only the information you need for riding - nothing more, nothing less.

Secondary Display: Color TFT - controlled by the thumb toggle or the smartphone app, the 5” screen displays the motorcycle’s status including batter charge, range, ride mode, and operating temperature.

Custom rearsets - optimally positioned for comfort and control. Rear Master - traditionally positioned foot-operated brake master.

Custom Hand Controls: From Brake Master - CNC aluminum racing master with adjustable-reach level.

Thumb Joystick: An intuitive 5-way thumb toggle that controls the blinkers and ride modes.

The Chassis

Zero XP by Untitled Motorcycles

The Zero XP’s chassis uses road-proven geometry and construction for strength and reliability.

The Powertrain

Custom Zero Motorcycle - The Zero XP

The Zero XP’s battery pack, controller, and motor are all supplied by Zero Motorcycles.

The large capacity 14.4kWh battery gives the Zero ZP a range of up to 161 miles. Vertical fins strengthen the structural aluminum case and assist in cooling the cells during charging.

The Numbers

Zero XP

Length: 80” / 204cm
Width: 27” / 68cm
Height: 39” / 98cm
Seat: 30” / 76cm
Weight: 481lbs / 218kg
Range: 80-160mi / 130-260km
Speed: 124mph / 200kmh

The Wrap Up

Zero XP front end

Eccles has already garnered lots of international acclaim with his unique Hyper Scrambler that made it on to Jay Leno's Garage, Playboy Magazine, Designboom and GQ Italia to name a few. His 1975 Moto Guzzi 850T ‘Supernaturale’ beat 300+ entrants to win the Design & Style Award at the Quail Motorcycle Gathering 2017. His "Fat Tracker" for Moto Guzzi's V9 Pro Build series was another note-worthy effort. Previous builds aside, his Zero XP stands alone in an entirely different universe where creativity, imagination, and stunning execution all live together perfect harmony.

"The XP isn’t intended as a future motorcycle but, instead, a present-day motorcycle from that parallel reality." - Hugo Eccles

Untitled Motorcycles: Web | Facebook | Instagram
Photography by Aaron Brimhall: Web | Instagram

Zero XP


Yamaha TX750 Cafe Racer by Ron George

1974 Yamaha TX750 Cafe Racer by Ron George

A Kenny Roberts Tribute

The Yamaha TZ750 was well known two-stroke race bike built by Yamaha 1970s. While the TZ750 is a well respected model, a much lesser known model, the TX750, was also built at the time. The TX750 was a SOHC parallel twin that seems like a model that we should all know. But why don't we? The TX750 was unfortunately plagued with engine reliability issues in its early production and even though Yamaha made several changes to solve the problems the bike was ultimately withdrawn from most markets after 1974 and production stopped in the home market after 1975. For custom builders, as more popular donor bikes get more expensive — like a TZ750, CB750, Bonneville, etc. — some of these less desirable models can be great options for a new project. That is, if you do your homework to make sure you're not getting a grenade, and are up for the challenge.

Recently we ran across Ron George, an Indiana-based shed builder, who has created a TX750 cafe racer that is right up our alley. Polished, handmade aluminum bodywork, a throwback Yamaha "speedblock" livery, and a keen attention to detail make for a stunning finished piece. We reached out to Ron for the feature and he kindly shared photos and details with us. Read below for the story of the build in his own words.

Yamaha TX750 Cafe Racer by Ron George

My name is Ron George, I'm a 37 year old family man from Hobart, Indiana (suburb of Chicago). I'm a husband and father to a 19 year old son. I work full time at a large steel mill in coke operations. My father was into motorcycles when I was growing up but my interests were more car related. I really got into motorcycles in late 2012. I work out of my 2 car garage at home. It's modest but I have most of what I need to get by. I try to do as much as possible without outsourcing.

Yamaha TX750 Cafe Racer tail

The build has taken just over 2 years now. I did all of it during my days off from work. I lost track of actual work hours though. This was just another personal build for me, with hopes to possibly sell in the future if the right buyer and deal comes along.

I received the bike as a gift from my buddy Aaron Collins. It was an abandoned project that he received but had no interest in. It was in very rough shape. It was the first one I'd ever seen in person and didn't know a lot about them. After learning more...I just had to give this thing some redemption. Anyone that remembers these knows that they have a bad history. They were a massive failure for Yamaha so I just had to see what I could do with one! Thankfully this was the updated model with all the fixes that plagued the original release. I was hugely inspired by the Kenny Robert's YZR500 for this build.

Yamaha TX750 Cafe Racer by Ron George

I don't sketch or do any computer renders. I get an idea in my head and go with it. The details usually change along the way but the main vision tends to remain. I really tried to improve some of the shortcomings of the original model while also just trying to add some good modern upgrades.

I started with designing a fully adjustable monoshock rear suspension. It was inspired by the Kenny Roberts TZ750. It utilizes a shock from an R6. Its height adjustable, as is the shock angle, in addition the stock's preload and dampening settings. Rebuilt forks up front with some GP quality Motul fluid. I also converted the front brakes to a dual disc using R6 axial mount calipers and some Suzuki rotors. I dreamed up an idea for a hydraulic rear drum brake to make up for the loss of leverage using rearsets. My past experience with rearsets and a rod acusted drum haven't been favorable. This setup uses an R6 master cylinder and moves a small slave cylinder. Vapor blasted the OE Mikuni Solez carbs and rebuilt them, plus added a handmade airbox. Re-laced and polished wheels with modern Metzeler rubber.

The engine seemed to be in good order so no internal changes were made. Just adjustments and normal servicing ad it had low mileage. I made a new oil tank and moved it to the tail area and it had custom AN and stainless hard lines up to an oil cooler. These had a strange and near unattainable oil filter design so I machined up an adapter than uses a BMW cartridge style filter. I also made a full TIG welded stainless 2-into-2 exhaust that exits through handmade mufflers.

Made a new wiring harness from scratch with modern connectors, lithium battery and modern reg/rec. An aluminum cockpit style gauge pod houses the speedo, tach, oil temp and oil pressure gauges, along with a Hella h3 headlamp.

I hand made all the bodywork from 3003 aluminum. The fuel tank, tail, fairings and fenders and then polished all of it (worst job ever). I also painted all of the Yamaha livery that was once again inspired by the Kenny Roberts race bikes of the day. The custom made seat was done to carry over the Yamaha speedblock design. It was done by Dane Utech.

Yamaha TX750 Cafe Racer custom seat

The whole build was challenging but I'd say all the metalwork was the hardest. As this was really my first time shaping aluminum,  I learned as I went along. I did every part of the build except for the seat...this build took a lot out of me.

I was one of the lucky chosen ones for an event called "The Greasy Dozen" held by Old Bike Barn. This build wouldn't have happened at this level or timeline without their help and the help of all the amazing sponsors. Unfortunately the Covid-19 pandemic cancelled the show but an online feature will still be happening.

1974 Yamaha TX750

  • All hand-formed 3003 aluminum bodywork
  • Painted on Yamaha livery
  • Custom made Speedblock design seat
  • Hand-formed aluminum gauge pod
  • 6061 clip on handlebars with R1 controls and Motorex fluid
  • Fully adjustable monoshock rear suspension with R6 shock
  • Custom hydraulic rear brake drum with R6 master cylinder
  • Dual disc front brakes with R6 axial mount calipers and Suzuki rotors
  • Custom made stainless brake lines
  • Rebuilt front forks with Motul fluid
  • Re-laced and polished DID aluminum wheels with Metzeler Sportec Klassik rubber
  • Handmade stainless 2-into-2 exhaust with handmade mufflers
  • Oil cooler with custom AN and stainless hard lines
  • Machined oil filter adapter
  • Machined 6061 foot controls and fairing mounts
  • All new wiring harness with modern connectors,  Antigravity lithium battery and modern reg/rec.
  • Vapor blasted and rebuilt Mikuni Solex carburetors with handmade airbox and Uni filter element

Yamaha TX750 Cafe Racer by Ron George

Ron George: Facebook | Instagram


Two-Face by Deus Harajuku

Our idea of playing dress up

Have you ever had more than one vision for the aesthetic for a particular motorcycle of yours? With our Bullitt OG, I always had a spare tank and seat that could drastically change the look and feel of the bike. One moment the bike could look like a stripped down cafe racer, and the next, a clean modern classic. Apparently the team at Deus Harajuku (that's their Tokyo location) had a similar idea; take one bike and essentially create two separate looks. Based on a 1982 BMW R100RS, they whittled down numerous designs down to two final looks. After some time in the garage, "Two Face" was born and ready to roam the streets of Tokyo.

Ever since its opening, The Residence of Impermanence, aka Deus Harajuku, has delivered custom motorcycles that incorporate the Deus DNA.

The Harajuku flagship’s final customization, Two Face, is a custom concoction of a BMW R100RS their builder had stashed away for years, waiting for just the right moment to give it new life.

Two Face custom BMW by Deus Harajuku

Initially forgotten but in excellent health, this Airhead had only run 4000 km — just enough run to it break in. For its rebirth he gave it a completely new “face” or you could say 2 faces and injected it with a dose of new modern oil and brought it back to life.

Custom by Scrambler by Deus Harajuku - Two Face

Two Face custom BMW tank

With any design process, many ideas are inevitably going to get scrapped. Their builder managed to curb his enthusiasm down to two concepts before hitting his creative wall. Instead of going with one or the other, he chose to go with both, customizing two tanks and modifying an exhaust system, headlight cowl and tail cowl to fit both. Similar parts merging in perfect balance creating a union of two vehicles into one.

“All you need is a screwdriver and wrench, and you can enjoy setting it up yourself depending on your mood that day, be it sporty or modern. It’s easy, like choosing an outfit,” laughed their builder as he polished Two Face, and a quote from Deus Ex Machina founder Dare Jennings came to mind:

THERE’S NO RIGHT WAY TO DO INDIVIDUALISM. IT’S ALL THE SAME JUICE
- Dare Jennings

There's just something so fun and practical about having two set ups. Like having a DRZ that can be a dirtbike one moment and a supermoto the next is a pretty clear 2-for-1. Yeah, you do have to get duplicate parts in some cases but it's a whole lot more affordable than building two complete bikes.

 

Two Face custom BMW by Deus Harajuku

Two Face custom BMW by Deus Harajuku

Personally, I dig the white slim tank and the steam punk front cowl most but also think the black/gold tank does look pretty proper. And maybe that's the reason why there are two. They're both rad for their own reasons and why just settle for one when you can have both?

Two Face custom BMW by Deus Harajuku

Deus Japan: Web | Facebook | Instagram
All Photos by Akira Kuwayama

Vagabund V13 custom motorcycle

Vagabund V13: Honda NX 650

3D printing motorcycle components

Austria-based custom shop Vagabund builds some clean bikes, predominately based on classic BMWs, like their V12 we recently featured. With their V13 build, they're taking their signature style to a very different platform — the dual-sport Honda NX 650. After two years of development, the Vagabund V13 uses 3D printing to product an angular, functional look that takes the old donor to a modern and elevated level.

Vagabund V13 custom motorcycle

On the Vagabund V13, the fuel tank, rear cowling, handlebar control housings, and turn signal brackets are all 3D-printed.

Vagabund V13 custom motorcycle

A Husqvarna front fender from a TC85 with a magnetic rack adds storage to the front, while two GKA fuel cans mount on either side of the seat for extended off-road range.

The engine has been completely rebuilt and a custom stainless-steel exhaust replaces the stock unit. New 320mm disc brakes and a Wilbers monoshock make the V13 ready for the outdoors, no matter how rough the terrain gets.

Vagabund V13 custom motorcycle

Taking an old (1991) Honda dual-sport and blending modern technologies and upgraded components is something we love to see. We've been eyeing an old XR400 to do something similar and this may have just gotten the creative juices flowing. Kudos to you Vagabund!

Vagabund V13 custom Honda NX 650

Vagabund V13 Specs

  • 3D printed fuel tank (Polyamid 12) with integrated motogadget mini speedo
  • 3D printed rear end, air filter cover, indicator light bracket and handlebar switch housings
  • Exhaust System: stainless steel manifold with custom-made two into one collector and modified Akrapovic muffler
  • 320mm HE disc brakes
  • Engine rebuild
  • Husqvarna TC85 front fender
  • Custom-made front rack with integrated Kellerman atto turn signals,
  • 3D printed indicator light bracket
  • Highsider headlights and quick release/magnetic mounting system for "Black Ember" bag
  • Wilbers shock
  • Custom made license plate holder with integrated Kellermann atto tail- / brake light / turn signal combination
  • GKA fuel pack with custom-made rack
  • Bridgestone Battlax tires
  • Custom made Alcantara seat
  • OTR oil cooler
  • Custom made rear frame
  • Powder coated wheels with stainless spokes
  • All new wiring
  • Modified fork bridge with new handlebar / clamps / controls / levers

Vagabund Moto: Online | Facebook | Instagram
Photography: Stefan Leitner


deBolex Engineering Scrambler Ducati cafe racer

Scrambler Ducati Cafe Racer by deBolex Engineering

A racy Scrambler Ducati

It's safe to say we're big fans of London-based builders, deBolex Engineering. Each build is expertly composed, with no detail overlooked. Quality over quantity rules here, and it’s something I certainly appreciate. Partners Calum and Des, are builders that perfect the details that no one would typically see. This Scrambler Ducati cafe racer is the 1100cc variation — the big brother to their 800cc version — is yet another prime example of the quality of their work.

deBolex Engineering Scrambler Ducati cafe racer

Utilizing a Scrambler Ducati 1100 as the base, this project was built in collaboration with Ducati UK and Scrambler Ducati to be used on the show circuit promoting the new 1100 model. On the larger 1100 model, the air-cooled L-Twin 86hp and 65 lb-ft of torque. Plenty of power for a nice little cafe racer!

deBolex Engineering Scrambler Ducati cafe racer

The Scrambler was delivered to Calum and Des with a super tight deadline. They had high aspirations for the build so they had to turn on the afterburners to get this cafe cranked out and ready for the masses to oogle.

deBolex Engineering Scrambler Ducati cafe racer

In usual deBolex fashion, there is more than meets the eye. Many details are neatly hidden, rerouted, and designed in a way to disappear. This is all intentional.

deBolex Engineering Scrambler Ducati cafe racer

The engine was intentionally left unmodified. Ducati wanted to show how versatile their base model is in stock form. The exhaust headers on all but the 1100 ‘Special’ look the business straight from the crate (the Special ones are chromed and ironically look less premium) so Calum removed pipework rearward from the cat and TiGed stainless bends to accept a throaty HP Corse silencer.

In relative short fashion, the Brits busted out this lovely Scrambler Ducati cafe racer, along with their 803 endurance racer just in time for the show circuit.

deBolex Engineering Scrambler Ducati cafe racer

deBolex Engineering Scrambler Ducati cafe racer

Seeing OEMs get behind custom builders and to showcase them alongside their stock bikes is something I'd like to see more of. It's something I supported during my tenure at both Ducati and Piaggio. What are your thoughts? Should manufactures commission more custom builds, or stay out of the custom scene?

Regardless of how you feel having the OEMs behind it, there's very little argument to be made over whether or not this deBolex is at the top of their game. They are. No debate needed.

 

deBolex Engineering: Online | Facebook | Instagram

Photos: Autohouse London


Behind The Bars with Allan Lane

Welcome to the second installment of Behind The Bars, The Bullitt’s celebration of the humans behind the machines we love. If you are a regular reader of this column you know we are generally bullish on the overall state of affairs within the moto industry simply because, well, we’re like you and are addicted to the sound, smell and sensation of riding. Plus, The Bullitt is located in SoCal which feels like the epicenter of motorcycle culture – we tend to only see the good and ignore the haters, industry articles and social media mentions about the flatlining of the motorcycle industry. Recently, we decided it would be fun to profile some of the people who inspire us, challenge our point of view on design, or in some cases, just one up themselves and the industry as a whole.

For our second feature, we've chosen Allan Lane, owner of SportBikes Inc Magazine and all-around good dude. In addition to running the online magazine, Allan also owns Hard Knocks Motorcycle Entertainment (HKME), which focuses on publishing, talent management, professional event planning/production, marketing, and promotion in the motorcycle industry. Safe to say the dude stays busy! And while the Philly-based bruiser might look tough, he is honestly one of the kindest, most genuine individuals in the motorcycle industry. Always greeting you with a smile, the man affectionately known as Black Moses (his words) will be quick to share some laughs and is always down to get in some riding. We're stoked to have Allan join us in the Behind the Bars series and are excited for you all to get to know him a little better right now. So without further ado..

Name: Allan Lane

Company: SportBikes Inc Magazine

Fun/interesting fact about yourself:
I enjoy a proper pairing of a single malt whiskey and a fine cigar.

What was the first bike you bought and why did you buy it?
A 1985 Honda Nighthawk 750. Why? Because it was what I could afford at the time. And it was black.

1985 Honda Nighthawk
Photo: Cycle World

What one person has influenced your interest in these machines - what about them helped form your ideas on this sport?
My older brother, Greg. If you took Mike Lowrey and Marcus Burnett from the first Bad Boys movie, you'd have my brother Greg. He taught me how to ride, and got me into the life.

You just found out you have one week to live. That gives you a few days to squeeze in 1-2 days of riding. What bike, and where do you go?
Bike: Ducati Panigale V4s. Where: Any proper road race circuit.

Photo: Ducati

What’s a life lesson you learned from motorcycles?
Bitch less. Ride more.

Have motorcycles helped you discover some aspect of your personality and/or have they helped you understand your purpose?
Yes. That it is more than ok to be alone. Long rides alone, up and down both the East and West Coasts help re-tune/re-harmonize my connection to the Universe. In that peace, I've found my purpose: I'm here to kick ass, no matter the task.

You have $10k and one hour to buy a bike…. Go.
A 2007 Ducati 999, black.

Photo: Top Speed

When non-riders question why you ride a machine that is so dangerous, what do you tell them?
I remind them that asking annoying questions to riders is even more dangerous. That pretty much ends the conversation.

What motorcyclist do you identify with and why? Ponch, McQueen, The Fonz, or Evel Knievel.
None of the above... Where are the Black Bike Legends???

Gear is a big part of this sport, what is one thing you cannot live without when riding?
All the gear, all of the time! Every bit of kit is just as important as the other.

Name a designer (or individual), not in the moto space, that influences your POV on your moto designs?
David Bowie. He possessed a lyrical fluidity that has influenced my riding and style.

Any cool projects/builds you're currently working on?
SportBikes Inc Magazine is doing great and growing. I just launched my Hard Knocks Moto moto-inspired coffee, mugs and apparel and more.

What's next for you? What project has your attention?
Pushing SportBikes Inc Magazine and Hard Knocks Moto to the next level, and beyond. More riding. More coffee. More life!

You're editing your own moto video - footage of you riding with best friends. What song opens the video?
"No Church in the Wild" Jay Z and Kanye West.

We're in this industry because it brings us joy. What was your most joyous day on a motorcycle to date?
I would need to roll all of my track time into one day. Track time is happy time. Actually, any seat time is happy time. I've never had a bad day on the bike.

Extra Credit - This industry is small, so give a shout out to a few people who are doing something unique, interesting or worth copying.
I must give love to my family at ICON Motosports, for always coming with the hottest street and now track gear that won't fail, in the event that my riding skills do...

Anything important we forgot to ask, or anything else you want to add?
Remain calm. Wash your hands. Less bitching. More riding. #blackmoses

SportsBike Inc: Online | Facebook | Instagram | Hard Knocks Moto


1974 Laverda SFC by Moto Borotago

1974 Laverda SFC by Moto Borgotaro

A spotless 1974 Laverda 750 SFC

Peter Boggia is a native New Yorker and operates a small motorcycle workshop called Moto Borgotaro in Brooklyn. The name, Borgotaro—which comes from the village in Italy Boggia traces his family tree to—is a nod to the Old World sense of value and tradition the shop aspires to. Boggia's level of restorations (or customs) is simply amazing.

I was at a Union Garage event a few years ago celebrating "Italian Sporting Bikes" of the seventies, and as Moto Borgotaro conveniently shares a wall with UG, they had their space open too. I was gobsmacked at the level of detail of every completed bike there. A MV Agusta 750 America, a Laverda SF2, a MV Agusta Magni 861, Ducati 900SS, Mike Hailwood, a Moto Guzzi V7 Sport Telaio Rosso... all looked as if they rolled off the factory floors. It was clear that Peter was obsessed with getting every detail right, and I love him for it.

I knew it was time time feature one of his builds and realized we have never covered a Laverda here. Not only did Boggia have a stunning 1974 Laverda 750 SFC cafe racer to share with us, it's also for sale too.

“INCORPORATING MANY DEVELOPMENTS OF THE 1973 FACTORY BIKES, THE 1974 750 SFC WAS ONE OF THE OUTSTANDING SPORTING MACHINES OF THE ERA.”

— IAN FALLOON, FALLOON REPORT

1974 Laverda SFC by Moto Borotago

The background on the 1974 Laverda SFC, told by Moto Borotago's owner Peter Boggia:

At only approx 541 units produced, the Laverda SFC is one of the best bikes for the buck you can collect and ride! This is a street legal factory race bike that pumps out approx. 70HP, it's fun, fast and vicious-- to me the SFC is the pinnacle of 70's Italian sport bikes, it hits all the marks and its built like a tank. This is the closest bike in feel to a Lamborghini Miura.

1974 Laverda SFC tail

At this point I can say with some authority, that I have owned, bought and sold more SFC Laverda’s then just about anyone in the US, if you look in previous sales, this bike is just 12 bikes later than the last SFC that came through the shop.

1974 Laverda SFC gauges

Every SFC is slightly unique, every bike has a story. This particular example has been in private ownership for the last 10 years, the current owner had the noted Laverda craftsman Scott Potter do a complete frame up rebuild with the intention to ride her on the beautiful California coastal roads. At this point a new Steel tank was acquired and paint matched to the rest of the bodywork, new parts were used as needed and the rear shocks were upgraded.

As the bike had been sitting, I decided to give her a once over and clean and replace the jets, set the points. After putting in some fresh fuel, this BEAST roared back to life. The time and money spent on the rebuild was obvious as the quick pull of the throttle felt the parallel twin whip the bike back and forth, the feel of the SFC is unmistakable. BUY, RIDE, COLLECT.


Representative of the second US specification batch (with numbers between 17110-17166), we introduce you to #17160

1974 Laverda SFC cafe racer

“WITH A LEFT SIDE GEARSHIFT MANDATORY ON ALL MOTORCYCLES BUILT AFTER SEPTEMBER 1974, THIS WAS THE FINAL SERIES 750 SFC READILY AVAILABLE IN THE US”

— IAN FALLOON

1974 Laverda SFC by Moto Borotago

1974 Laverda SFC engine

1974 LAVERDA SFC DETAILS

  • Frame #17160
  • Engine #17160
  • Dell’Orto PHB 36mm carburetors
  • Borrani aluminum wheel rims
  • Ceriani suspension * rear is Marzocchi
  • Electron rear hub and sprocket carrier
  • High quality aluminum replica gas tank
  • Nippon Denso instruments
  • Smaller European taillight
  • Original parts included

The US-17000-series 750 SFC included 3C Nippon Denso instruments and switches, and adjustable Tommaselli handlebars.

The US-17000-series 750 SFC included 3C Nippon Denso instruments and switches, and adjustable Tommaselli handlebars.

Twin bleed Brembo F08 series rear disc brake and Electron rear hub and sprocket carrier.

1974 Laverda SFC - rear end

Moto Borgotaro: Online | Facebook | Instagram

Photography by James Tyler Reed


Moto Guzzi Airtail Cafe Racer by Death Machines of London

Repurposing a 1981 LeMans MK2

Death Machines of London, you say? The founders of DMOL feel it should be fairly obvious what they do (hint: its custom motorcycles). So, on their website instead of wasting everyone’s time with "marketing bollocks", they break down where their unique name came from. Sitting comfortably?

Airtail cafe racer - Death Machines of London

When he was twelve, Death Machines of London founder James Hilton’s uncle took him on his first motorcycle ride. The uncle advised him not to tell his dad. So he told his dad to see what would happen. Motorcycles going down like a bag of shit is what happened. 'Motorcycles are death machines, son.' was the concluding advice.

Death Machines of London custom Moto Guzzi

Such advice clearly fell on deaf ears. And so, thirty(ish) years later, they named their company after all those completely ignored words of wisdom.

For their very first custom build, Hilton selected a lovely 1981 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mark 2 for the base. There are a few striking elements that make the completed bike stand out, and there are a number of less obvious upgrades that make the bike truly special as well.

cafe racer from Death Machines of London

Getting the build started, the entire motorcycle, engine and gearbox were completely disassembled and vapor blasted prior to a forensic inspection of all original parts.

Bringing the Le Mans’ suspension up-to-date, new internals and cartridges were installed in the original front forks. The rear shocks were swapped out for a new set of Hagons, and the original, refurbished wheels were wrapped in Pirelli Sport Demons.

The original instrumentation has been completely restored and housed in a bespoke dash, incorporating 1940 Merlin Spitfire aviation warning lights and main switch. How cool is that?

The frame has been delugged & “airtailed” - an idea proposed by the client - to provide a refined minimalism, ensuring all electrical components are hidden from view.

Airtail cafe racer by Death Machines of London

The completed 950cc engine features a polished, lightened and balanced crankshaft, in-house gas flowed cylinder heads and all-new valves.

Moto Guzzi cafe racer by Death Machines of London

The motor now breathes through a pair of 40mm Dellorto carbs with accelerator pumps. A lightweight R.A.M. clutch and flywheel were also installed.

Death Machines of London custom cafe racer

On the bars, drastically reduced switchgear is made possible with their in-house custom loom utilizing an M-Unit control box.

Death Machines of London custom Moto Guzzi cockpit

Precision paintwork is in Italian Red gloss and a satin finish Old English white, with a hand painted Moto Guzzi logo. There just something so striking about the combo of raw steel and gloss paint.

Death Machines of London custom Moto Guzzi tank

The result of all of their hard work is a stunning Guzzi café racer. This is surely a bike we’d want in our garage. What about you?

Death Machines of London custom Moto Guzzi

Death Machines Of London: Online | Facebook | Instagram

Photos by James Hilton and David Clerihew


Indian FTR 1200 S film test

Indian FTR 1200 S - A film study

Spending a day in analog

There's no question today's digital cameras offer stunning images and a slew of advantages over their analog predecessors. That's right, film cameras. And while we love modern technologies and conveniences, like you, we also appreciate vintage. Coincidentally, my brother Braedon is a professional photographer and also runs a company that specializes in equipment and gear for film photographers called Film Supply Club. Before the coronavirus lockdowns, he wanted to shoot a video for his site on some newly re-released Fuji film and needed a subject to shoot. I was already out riding the new Indian FTR 1200 S and was happy to oblige.

Patrick Flynn riding an Indian FTR 1200 S motorcycle
Shot on Fuji Acros II 35mm

Throughout the video — which you can see below — Braedon goes through different camera settings and a slew of different settings to see how the film reacts. The point of his testing is so those interested in the film don't have to experiment quite as much, as experimentation with film can be costly. I'm not an avid film photographer myself so it was fun to watch the process, and even more interesting to see the results. And for those of us who haven't shot with film in some time, remember you have to wait to see the finished product. What a novel concept!

Film Supply Club - Indian FTR1200
Here you can see the same shot, same film, with different settings.

Our friends at The Brand Amp, Indian's agency, were kind enough to lend me the FTR 1200 S and I had been dying to give that bike a go. Ever since my days at Ducati, I had loved the Monster 1200 S and assumed this bike would be similar. It short, it was. The suspension is adjustable on both ends but I didn't mess with settings. For the riding I was doing, I was plenty happy with the stock settings. Being on the S model, the bike was equipped with an impressive high-visibility 4.3" LCD touch screen. Bluetooth connectivity was super easy. This particular model was slightly accessorized with tank covers and their "Rally" seat.

Indian FTR 1200 S - Patrick Flynn

 

Initial impressions on the bike were that there was plenty of power and the chassis felt solid. A 1203cc V-twin engine delivers 123 hp and 87 ft-lbs of low-end torque. Power delivery was progressive and responsive. I put in a full day in the saddle and was plenty comfortable and happy at the end of the day. Cruise control helped for longer stints of highway riding.

Equilibrialist Leo Maska for the Nexx G.100
Field testing the Equilibrialist Leo Maska for the Nexx G.100

 

Patrick Flynn of The Bullitt on a Indian FTR 1200 S

We couldn't have asked for a nicer day. Shooting up in the local orange county hills around Cook's Corner, we had plenty of open roads and good times. Check out the video below and let any of your friends who shoot film to check out Film Supply Club!

Indian FTR 1200 S test

Film Supply Club: Online | Facebook | Instagram

Pat's Riding Style


Ducati Monster custom

Ducati Monster 1200S...Superbike?

A Ducati medley

Ducati Monsters are a great choice for customizers and have gone under the knife more than a Beverly Hills housewife. Being one of the original naked bikes, very few choose to "dress them" with fairings. And while few have dared over the years, Raul Fattori from Calenzano, Italy was up for the challenge.

Custom Ducati Monster mixed with Ducati 888

Fattori has been in love with the lines of the 90s motorcycles for years - especially the Ducati 888 and 900SS - but had never pulled the trigger on getting a bike of his own. Two years ago he purchased a Ducati Scrambler and converted it into a nice little cafe racer.  While he fell in love with his new Scrambler, he found it too small and lacking in power.

Custom Ducati Monster mixed with Ducati 900SS

So, he set his sights on something still retro with performance and modern reliability, but with a nod to some of the historical Ducati's he'd grown to love.

Custom Ducati Monster mixed with Ducati 900SS - termignoni

Selecting a modern Ducati Monster 1200 S as his new base, Raul set off with the basic plans to mate the bodywork of an old Ducati 900 SS to the Monster. For a slight twist, Fattori decided he wanted to run headlights derived from the 999 front end. And as things tend to go in full-custom situations, that was the point in which the build started to get a little out of hand.

Custom Ducati Monster mixed with Ducati 900SS

After getting the bodywork roughly mounted, Raul felt that the rear didn't work as-is, having to much of a dirt-oriented feel. He'd seem some previous attempts online before, most opting for the rear borrowed from a SportClassic, which he knew he didn't want to pursue himself. After some online and offline mock ups, he settled on the tail of an 888, and paired that with the original base of the Monster's saddle. The original lines of the 888's tail needed to be extended get the profile he was going for. 

Custom Ducati Monster mixed with Ducati 900SS

While the profile was important, the Italian didn't want to sacrifice a proper riding position. To enhance the overall ride, he added adjustable rearsets, reversed the gearbox, and modified the Quick shifter's plug. The original steering stabilizer was repositioned along with the gauges to fit under its new skin.

Custom Ducati - modern and vintage combined

Raul wanted to stress that he's not a professional bike builder and doesn't sell his parts. This is just something that he had a passion for and set of to get it done. Throughout the bike there are various carbon fiber pieces - all of which were made by Fattori - in his spare time. Another interesting fact about his build is that all of the work is plug & play, meaning the bike could theoretically be set back to stock. 

Custom Ducati front end cafe racer

There's little doubt that we love Ducatis. New ones, old ones...we love just about all of them. But to see someone, motivated out of pure passion, make something as special and unique as Raul has accomplished it make us love them even more. Ducati as a brand has some wildly local enthusiasts, Ducatisti as they're known, and while Fattori might be newer to the club, it's also clear that his passion (and skills) will take him places.
Raul Fattori - Instagram

Gear Review :: Nexx Helmets X.G200 Purist Modern-Retro Helmet

Retro styling. Modern Safety.

It's safe to say that most riders here understand the importance of wearing a helmet when riding a motorcycle. It always blows my mind to travel to a state where there are no helmet laws and to just see people cruising the highways in a backwards hat. This sport is dangerous enough WITH proper gear on! And while we completely understand the necessity of wearing a helmet, we also know that style matters. All things "modern retro" are in at the moment, and that's not a bad thing. Back in the 60's and 70's styles were on point. While style ruled back then, the safety features in modern equipment is far, far improved. So, with the modern retro styling, you're really getting the best of both worlds. Old school style with new school tech.  There are plenty of modern retro helmet options these days, but when we saw the Nexx Helmets X.G200 Purist, we knew we had to get our hands on one.

The Nexx Helmets X.G200 Purist comes is either matte white or matte black. Both shells come with a black visor in the Purist family. There are a number of retro-inspired paint jobs available as well. The Superhunky version is pretty rad but nothing matches better than all black, right?

The Nexx Helmets X.G200 Purist embraces the vintage MX-spirit and pairs it up with a modern fit and finish.

Features:

  • Adjustable peak
  • Forehead ventilation
  • Large vintage-proportioned viewport
  • Removable lining
  • Peak/visor with 2 positions
  • Double-D ring buckle
  • Top ventilation
  • Chin ventilation
  • Ergo padding system
  • Weight: 2.65 lbs + - 50grs
  • 2 shell sizes: XS-MD, LG-2XL

 

Nexx X.G200 Purist Helmet

Overall riding impressions with the helmet were good. As expected, it's well ventilated and also lets in plenty of road and wind noise. That's just the nature of the open face MX-style helmets. The liner looks and feels of high-quality and is also removable. So go ahead, get dirty, have fun, and don't forget to wash your helmet when you're done. If you're in the market for a well styled lid to pair with your vintage bike or modern classic, look no further than the Nexx Helmets X.G200 Purist. Solid bang for your buck quality and looks that reach well beyond the price point.

Nexx Helmets: Online | Facebook | Instagram

Photography by Mr. Pixelhead 

Riding Style


The One Motorcycle Show 2020

PDX moto mayhem

The One Motorcycle Show descends upon Portland, OR once a year and is now in its 11th year. The show is going on this weekend and boasts to have 10,000 beers , 5,000 high-fives, 200+ bikes, 5 bands, 70 vendors, 20 partners, 15 race classes all under ONE roof! One of the best things about The One Motorcycle Show is that there's really something for everyone. Vintage bikes, cafe racers, trackers, modern retro builds, choppers, vintage motocross bikes, mini bikes, side cars, vintage board trackers, all the way to futuristic electric bikes. Lucky for us, we have our good friend, and amazing photographer, Erik Jutras on the scene. Enjoy!

Zero XP by Hugo Eccles
Zero XP by Hugo Eccles

Indian Hooligan racer at The One Motorcycle Show
Indian Hooligan racer
Futuristic tail on Hugo Eccles Zero XP at The One Motorcycle Show
Futuristic tail on Hugo Eccles Zero XP
The One Motorcycle Show is getting fancy
The One Motorcycle Show is getting fancy
Part of the "21 Helmets" display; Blind Optmism by Bryce Wang
2-stroke goodness
Flat tracker from The One Motorcycle Show
The Lunar Project by Carboni e Metalli
The essence of The One Motorcycle Show
Vintage vibes
Norton racer
Norton GP-750 racer by Bilton-Smith

The One Motorcycle Show - Instagram | Facebook

Photos: Erik Jutras - Instagram | Facebook


Championship Cycles Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada

A lightweight Italian supermodel

I met Mike Vienne in person a few years ago at a track day and he had shown up with some pretty killer builds. Over conversations not only discovered that he builds awesome "track ready: street legal" bikes but that I had actually featured one of his previous builds; a Triumph T120R on The Bullitt back in 2014. Small world! Needless to say Mike stayed in touch and when he started working on his super-light Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada we wanted to hear and see more. After wrapping up the build, we eagerly waited for some details and photos. Mike shared a detailed write up in the Championship Cycles Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada and share the story in his own words below.

Photo: Jeanne Vienne

"Sandro Parra (Service Manager at Pro Italia) actually connected the owner with me. The client wanted to to revive his very worn out 1995 900SS. In it’s past it had been through a few mechanics and been modded with several upgrades (carbs, wheels, etc) but it was ridden hard and put away wet. From a distance the bike looked ok, but the nearer you got… It had been sitting parked for many years after the motor gave out. A good portion of the original bodywork was damaged and the tank and carburetors were caked solid with the evaporated remains of 5 year old fuel.

As these things typically go, there was a process. Expectations versus funds versus reality. Many discussions regarding the very ambitious goals coupled with a less than equal to the task budget was an early challenge. I compiled a quick (long) list of what it would take to fix everything that we were starting with which led me to conclude that in fact, there wasn’t all that much. From what we had to start with, the idea of trying to obtain Superbike levels of performance was going to be difficult on the initial budget.

Championship Cycles Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada
Photo: Jeanne Vienne

The 900SS is an iconic motorcycle. In fact, the first Ducati I ever rode was my buddy’s back in the early 90’s. I loved everything about it immediately  (the torque, the sound, the Italian “soul”, did I say, the torque!) but it’s a SuperSport afterall not a 916 and its very heavy. 415lb dry, I think.

So, like most all of my builds I chose to focus on handling and lightness as the foundation of the build. Lotus design engineer Colin Chapman once said, “simplify, then add lightness”. I use that a lot. Performance upgrades to the broken motor were discussed and dismissed. Upgrading and rebuilding the existing motor and carburetors was going to be costly and ultimately less than satisfying from a performance standpoint. In terms of horsepower, the stock bike puts out roughly mid 70’s. I proposed that we build a more modern version of Ducati’s own 900SS Superlight, which was a limited edition, produced for 2 years in the mid 90’s, with a few carbon bits and Marvic wheels, etc. It’s pretty collectible now.

Photo: Jeanne Vienne
Anyway, rather than fix what we had (which was just about everything), I floated the idea of upgrading everything all in one go, while keeping the outward appearance of a classic 900 SuperSport. A  EFI Monster 1100 Dual Spark motor could work with relative ease with the existing chassis and swingarm and due to newer manufacturing processes it would actually be lighter than the original 900SS engine. Plus you gain a modern reliable mappable ECU in the process all of which was rated at 95hp. Stepping up to fully adjustable suspension and radial brakes would both be significant upgrades over stock as well.

 

Ultimately, as the enthusiasm for the bike grew so did the budget and subsequently more money was allocated to the project. We ended up removing the stock fork internals and replacing them with a Mupo cartridge kit and while they were apart anodizing and Ti Nitride coating the external pieces to give us the look we were after.  Likewise, the brakes were replaced with Brembo’s high end billet GP-4RXs clamping down on BrakeTech’s Iron Axis rotors via a new Brembo Corsa Corta radial master cylinder. Essentially we upgraded the upgrades.

 

Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada brakes
Photo: Shaik Ridzwan
The stock oil cooler was up specked to a higher capacity custom mounted Febur unit to keep engine temps in control on hot Southern California days. And I added a few additional performance enhancements that I think all modern bikes (especially Ducatis) benefit from: a Yoyodyne slipper clutch, a quick shifter, a set of performance air intakes to help it breathe more freely and I reflashed the ECU.
Championship Cycles Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada cockpit
Photo: Shaik Ridzwan
In a continuing effort to keep the weight in check the bodywork is all carbon. I was able to find an unobtainium set of original Ducati Performance carbon side panels and had a tail and nose fabricated to match. The fuel tank is actually a kevlar fuel cell. Combined those items alone shed about 20lbs of unnecessary weight!

 

Then I went about trying to lose more gratuitous weight: detab the steel frame, remove all nonessential wiring and componentry. Fabricate a bunch of bits out of light weight aluminum in lieu of using the o.e. heavier steel parts.  Discreet LED lighting and a simple race seat pad replace their heavier counterparts. Essentially, strip it down to it’s core elements. It all sounds simple enough, but in reality it took much more time to ensure everything was going to work and play nice together. Ultimately, there’s room to gain even more weight savings in the future (i.e wheels) But as it sits right now we ended up right around the mid 300’s weight wise - and that’s with a full fuel load.

 

Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada
Photo: Shaik Ridzwan
After it was all together (before final disassembly for paint and powdercoat) I took the bike up to Willow Springs for a few shakedown laps on the big track and I have to say it’s pretty fantastic. The suspension, brakes and overall lightness come together really well and allow you to dive into any corner much deeper and later than ever before. It’s not going to outrun a modern liter bike down the front straight, but you’ll certainly out brake them going into the first corner, get it turned and back on the power ahead of them. And quick transition corners like turns 3 and 4 of the Omega are effortless.

 

However, in the end the bike is much more likely to spend time carving roads in the nearby canyons than on the track- so we stepped away from the Superlight moniker and I chose SuperStrada as it’s new name. The paintwork and graphics are an homage to the Cagiva era bikes, yet with a modernish feel.  I’ll tell you though it took quite of bit of work to get those wavy original fairing panels straight so that the paint looks like glass, but the results speak for themselves." - Mike Vienne of Championship Cycles

 

Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada in action
Photo: Shaik Ridzwan
Ducati 900 SS SuperStrada major mods:
1100DS EFI/ECU motor
Quickshifter
Slipper clutch
All carbon bodywork
Kevlar fuel cell
Mupo cartridge internals in custom coated forks
Ohlins rear shock
LED lighting
Febur oil cooler
Single sided exhaust
Brembo GP4RX CNC nickel plated calipers
High-performance air intakes
Brembo Corsa Corta
Brembo clutch
Brake Tech iron axis rotors
Lightweight Sprockets with 520 conversion

Championship Cycles:
Online | Instagram || Photos: Shaik Ridzwan and Jeanne Vienne

Harley-Davidson ‘The Hardley’ by Revival Cycles

A bespoke Sportster from Austin, TX

The dudes at Austin-based Revival Cycles definitely do their own thing, and they've been doing it that way since they first started. Revivial has put out some amazing builds over the years - Pyro is still one of my favorites and their BMW Birdcage I covered this year was mental - yet somehow raw little Harley speaks to me. Meet The Hardley - a customized Harley-Davidson street tracker.

The Hardley custom Harley-Davidson by Revival Cycles

Revival founder, Alan Stulberg, posted a photo of The Hardley on his Facebook page recently and reminded me how much I dug this thing when it came out it 2014. I went to see what I wrote about it then and was shocked to see that we didn't cover it here. There's something about the minimalistic aesthetic that demand my attention and convinced me that almost six years later, it deserves a feature here.

The Hardley custom Harley-Davidson by Revival Cycles exhaust

Even from a distance, it's clear that the Hardley is unique and interesting, but the more you dig in, the more clearly the beauty comes into focus. Utilizing a 2010 Harley-Davidson Sportster 883 as the donor, the team made quick work of tearing it down and removing most of it.

The 883 isn't know for being exceptionally light...or powerful,  but that just added to the challenge. The engine received a new piston kit as well an increase in capacity to 1250cc. Once all was said and done, with the addition of the custom mapped fuel injection and ECU, larger valves and new ports, the modified engine now produces a total of 73 lb-ft of torque and 100 horsepower, which is a significant improvement.

The Hardley custom Harley-Davidson by Revival Cycles left side

The Hardley custom Harley-Davidson by Revival Cycles - right side

The three-piece tank is certainly a standout feature on the bike. It was originally built as a single piece, then split into three separate compartments. The left half houses 3 gallons of gas, with the right being split into two quarters. The electronics are neatly hidden in the front quarter and the rear right is now an oil pan.

Another hand-built feature on the bike we love is the unique exhaust completed with a SuperTrapp muffler is another focal point. The Supertrapp allows the bike to purr at idle but roar when pinned.

For suspension, they swapped in some upside-down forks from a Kawasaki ZX-14, and paired them with fully adjustable Ikon shocks.

Revival Cycle's The Hardley

To get the stance dialed in, Revival opted for 19” wheels wrapped in the very sticky Maxxis dirt-track tires. Braking is made possible via alloy and ceramic composite rotors paired with Brembo monobloc calipers and custom-built stainless steel brake lines.

Custom Harley Davidson The Hardley dirt tracker wheels

Rather than converging to a chain drive, The Hardley's belt drive was retained. Revival CNC-milled their own beautiful rear pulley, matching the shape of the rear brake rotor. To keep belt tension on point, they made a custom spring-loaded idle arm to ride on the belt.

Custom belt drive for The Hardley custom Harley

The rear of the original 883 was binned and replaced with a new custom lightweight chromoly subframe, donning a very slim distressed leather seat made by Ginger at New Church Moto.

The Hardley custom Harley-Davidson

The end result of The Hardley is a stripped down, well handling, relatively powerful Harley that "hardley" bears any resemblance with it's original self. Well done gents, well done.

Revival Cycles: Online | Facebook | Instagram