Get your Black Friday on with Schott

Weekend long savings!

Black Friday Savings from Schott NYC

Schott NYC is best known for their amazing leather goods - like this killer vintage cafe racer jacket - but aside from jackets, they have tons of other moto-inspired apparel and accessories.

Instead of shopping for a new TV, why not get something that can be passed down to future generations? This weekend, Schott is offering an exclusive discount, which we are happy to share with you. From Friday, November 29th through Monday, December 2nd receive 15% OFF your purchase*. Make sure to enter the coupon code STUFFED2019 at checkout to apply your discount. For those of you shopping today it looks like the code is already live so get on it!

Hand Vintaged Cowhide Café Racer Jacket

Head over to Schott NYC and start shopping.

 

*Not valid on previously placed orders. Does not apply to freight charges. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Not valid towards gifts card purchases. Terms and conditions apply.


Indian Motorcycles’s 2020 Thunder Stroke Lineup First Ride Review

Indian Motorcycles’s 2020 Thunder Stroke Lineup First Ride Review (12 Fast Facts)

Once you go bagger...

I was beyond stoked when I got the call from my friends at Ultimate Motorcycling to see if I could step in for an upcoming Indian launch. My mind instantly got to wandering and I was hoping it was some new variation of the FTR1200, but that seemed too soon. Once I got a little detail, I learned that it was going to be on two new Indian Scout models as well as the new 2020 Thunder Stoke line up. I knew I'd feel at home on the Scouts - I'd ridden a few of them before - but I'd never ridden any of Indians big baggers. And while baggers are stylistically not my cup of tea, these days they are packed full of creature comforts and a blast to ride.

My write up for the new Scouts went live on Ultimate Motorcycling but they're letting me share some fast facts on the new Thunder Stoke range with you all here.

Indian Motorcycles’s 2020 Thunder Stroke

1) Thunder Stroke 116 Engine Now Standard in Select Models. For the first time in the company’s history, Indian Motorcycle will offer a 116 cubic-inch Thunder Stroke engine in select models. Straight from the factory, the new 116 cubic-inch air-cooled Vtwin engine features a new high-flow cylinder head that delivers class-leading performance with 126 ft-lbs of torque. The Thunder Stroke 116 is now standard on the Springfield Dark Horse, Chieftain, Chieftain Dark Horse, Chieftain Limited, Chieftain Elite, Roadmaster and Roadmaster Dark Horse.

The iconic Thunder Stroke 116
The iconic Thunder Stroke 116 delivers 126 ft-lbs of torque for exceptional acceleration and power

2)  Ride Command Features Connected Services - with Traffic & Weather Overlays. For 2020, Indian Motorcycle introduces exciting updates to their Ride Command system with Connected Services – a completely redesigned version of its industry-leading infotainment system. Still measuring seven inches, with glove-touch technology, Ride Command now features a new quad-core processor to provide the fastest infotainment experience available. New connected features include traffic and weather overlays, so riders can plan their ride to avoid traffic and poor weather conditions.I didn’t get to play with the weather overlays but can confirm that the dash was intuitive and easy to manage with gloves on. I synched my phone at a long light and had my phone back in my pocket before it turned green, Pandora bumping.

3) New Roadmaster Dark Horse Features Modern Aggressive Styling. With blacked-out finishes and just enough chrome to stand out from the 2020 lineup, the Roadmaster Dark Horse features a streamlined fairing, slammed saddlebags, 19-inch front wheel with an open fender, an extended reach rogue gunfighter seat, blacked-out engine and matte paint color schemes. Powering this mean touring machine is the Thunder Stroke 116, while premium touring amenities abound, including a touring trunk, lower fairings, heated grips and a mid-adjustable windscreen.

4) New Springfield Dark Horse Gets a Similar Modern Treatment. Following extremely positive rider feedback from the 2020 Jack Daniel’s Limited Edition Indian Springfield Dark Horse that was launched at Daytona Bike Week, Indian Motorcycle is now offering a similar design package for the 2020 Springfield Dark Horse. While the Thunder Stroke 116 delivers unrivaled power, the bike gains an enormous level of attitude with slammed saddlebags, rogue seat, 12-inch mini apes and premium blacked-out finishes.

Indian Springfield Dark Horse
Indian Springfield Dark Horse

5) Chieftain Elite Returns with Two-Tone Paint, Upgraded PowerBand Audio System & Premium Amenities. As it has with previous iterations, the Chieftain Elite is an ultra-premium bagger – combining style, technology and performance. The 2020 Chieftain Elite packs the Thunder Stroke 116 and Indian Motorcycle’s booming PowerBand Audio Plus system with integrated fairing and saddlebag speakers. PowerBand Audio produces crystal-clear sound that is 50% louder than Indian Motorcycle’s standard audio system. The 2020 Chieftain Elite’s premium styling includes a two-tone Thunder Black Vivid Crystal over Wildfire Candy paint with matching motor highlights and badging, precision machined elite wheels, pinnacle mirrors, select rider floorboards, and a flare windshield.

Indian Chieftain Elite
Indian Chieftain Elite

6) Indian Motorcycle’s Ride Command is the industry’s largest, fastest and most-customizable infotainment system on two wheels. The screen is formidable, easy to read, and intuitive to use.

7) Chief Dark Horse and Chief Vintage will now share the same chassis as the Springfield and Springfield Dark Horse. The result is improved handling and an adjustable rear suspension for both Chief models.

8) The Springfield and Chief Dark Horse will each come standard with a 17-inch front wheel. The new 17-inch front wheel offers improved stability.

9) Add up to 4% more power with the Stage 1 kit. Indian Motorcycle’s new stage 1 oval slip-on muffler kit and stage 1 performance air intake together increase horsepower by 4% with the Thunder Stroke 111 and 8% with the Thunder Stroke 116.

10) Add up to 17% more power with the Stage 2 kits. By adding the stage 2 performance cams, riders will gain 13% more horsepower when compared to a stock Thunder Stoke 111. The Thunder Stroke 116 stage 2 performance kit, which includes cams, higher flowing fuel injectors and throttle body, produce a 17% horsepower boost when paired with both Stage 1 accessories.

11) Upgrade your Thunder Stroke 111 to a Stage 3 Thunder Stroke 116. Riders can also upgrade any Indian Motorcycle model packing the Thunder Stroke 111 with its Thunder Stroke 116 stage 3 big bore kit, which produces 20% more horsepower when compared to a stock Thunder Stroke 111.

12) The 2020 Roadmaster receives a lighter weight and redesigned trunk rack for added style. So the Roadmaster went on a diet and got more stylish? Sounds like a good deal to me!

Pricing and color options for each 2020 Thunder Stroke model is as follows:

Chief Dark Horse, starting at $18,499: Thunder Black Smoke
Chief Vintage, starting at $19,999: Thunder Black; Willow Green over Ivory Cream
Springfield, starting at $20,999: Thunder Black; Burgundy Metallic over Titanium Metallic
Springfield Dark Horse, starting at $22,499: Thunder Black Smoke; Sagebrush Smoke; White Smoke
Chieftain, starting at $21,999: Thunder Black; Titanium Smoke (with Thunder Stroke 116)
Chieftain Classic, starting at $25,499: Thunder Black; Deepwater Metallic over Dirt Track Tan
Chieftain Dark Horse, starting at $27,999: Thunder Black Smoke; Ruby Smoke; Titanium Smoke
Chieftain Limited, starting at $27,999: Thunder Black Pearl; Radar Blue; Thunder Black Pearl with graphics package
Chieftain Elite, starting at $34,999: Thunder Black Vivid Crystal over Wildfire Red Candy
Roadmaster Dark Horse, starting at $28,999: Thunder Black Smoke; White Smoke; Ruby Smoke
Roadmaster, starting at $29,999: Thunder Black; Burgundy Metallic; Pearl White over Titanium Metallic with black pinstripe; Titanium Smoke over Thunder Black Smoke with silver pinstripe

 

Action photography by Barry Hathaway

Riding Style


MotoBeachClassic2019_Hero

Moto Beach Classic 2019

Hooligans take over Huntington Beach

Surfing, hooligans, custom motorcycles and flat track racing are some of the best things in the world. Combine them together in Surf City, USA and you get the Moto Beach Classic.

The Moto Beach Classic returned to Bolsa Chica State Beach Saturday, October 26th for a day of exciting motorcycle racing, live music sets, surf competition, art show, custom bike show, vendors and much more.

The Moto Beach Classic in only its third year has rapidly become a marquee beach event. The Moto Beach Classic draws motorcyclists, artists, musicians, and fans from all walks of life, cultivating a community of eclectic humans celebrating a life on two wheels at the heart of Southern California Beach Culture.

I don't have much else to say. Good times, with good friends. Here are some images from the day. Looking forward to Moto Beach 2020 already!

Vintage Indian Motorcycle

 


Moto Talbot Museum

Vintage moto heaven in Carmel

If you're a fan of vintage motorcycles, and guess you are if you're here...you really need to know about Moto Talbott Museum. Located in Carmel Valley, California, Moto Talbott Museum features more than 170 iconic motorcycles from 16 countries, and is located on one of Northern California’s most beautiful motorcycle roads. The landscape and riding alone is worth the trip there, but once you're inside, it's a moto mecca. Founded by Robb Talbott - perhaps best known as the founder of the world-famous Talbott Vineyards and curated curator and restorer by Bobby Weindorf (more on him below). And while Robb Talbott loved his California wines, there was something else equally special to him: motorcycles.

A proper Manx Isle of Man racer at Moto Talbott Museum
A proper Manx Isle of Man racer

Young Robb developed a youthful fascination with the speed, noise and commotion of the nearby Laguna Seca Raceway. Eventually he acquired a “very used” Honda 50 step-through, which he remembers as “the most fun he’d ever had.” By the time he left to study Fine Art and Design at Colorado College in 1966, Talbott was irretrievably in love with two wheels. He acquired a succession of small displacement Suzukis, and then a pantheon of iconic dirt bikes, including a BSA 441, Jawa, Bridgestone, Kawasaki and a Sachs. But his most memorable bike of all was the venerable two-stroke Yamaha DT-1 250. During this time he raced motocross and winter hill climbs. In 2001, seeking release from the pressures of a demanding work life, he was inspired to buy one of the new, reincarnated Triumph Bonnevilles.

Wayne Rainey's Yamaha YZR500 at Moto Talbott Museum
Wayne Rainey's Yamaha YZR500

500cc's of 2-stroke goodness

“I never lost my love of motorcycles. This whole thing wouldn’t work if I didn’t have the passion. I love motorcycles.”

— Robb Talbott

1973 Ducati 750 Sport at Moto Talbott Museum
1973 Ducati 750 Sport

Robb read “The Art of the Motorcycle” from the Guggenheim Museum. For Talbott the exhibit was an epiphany: there, framed against the magnificent building, he saw history’s most significant bikes in an artistic context. “For the first time, I realized that motorcycles could qualify as art,” he says. “I started getting really excited about that idea. When you see the cooling fins on an MV Agusta, or the sculpting of a Rickman hub, you realize they’re art.”

Kenny Robert's 1980 Yamaha YZR500 at Moto Talbott Museum
Kenny Robert's 1980 Yamaha YZR500
A lovely MV Agusta 750 Sport at Moto Talbott Museum
A lovely MV Agusta 750 Sport
1977 MV Agusta 850SS at Moto Talbott Museum
1977 MV Agusta 850SS

Suddenly, Robb found himself buying bikes, for the sheer pleasure of their aesthetic presence. Some he had restored, and others he left as they were, resplendent with the patina of age and their strong pedigree. “I’ve always loved barn bikes,” Robb says. Pretty soon, the barn was full. And before long, the fledgling notion of a museum was born. In 2015, after 33 years of hard work, he sold Talbott Vineyards, and began devoting all his time to the concept of the Moto Talbott Collection, a 501 (c)(3) non-profit devoted to preservation, restoration, and education. By then he had already accumulated more than 140 bikes from 12 countries.

Clearly Robb has eclectic taste

There is no logic to the Talbott collection, other than the most logical thing of all: it’s full of stuff Robb likes. This means three large categories: vintage dirt bikes, MV Agustas and all things Italian; and tiny, 175cc, pre-1957 Motogiro bikes. There are even a few vintage bicycles.

“I don’t believe you can build anything of note without passion,” says Robb. “The motorcycle museum is phase three for me, after the clothing company and the winery. I want to give back to the sport that has given so much to me.

Italian beauty. An old Gilera racer
1911 Indian Board Tracker at Moto Talbott Museum
1911 Indian Board Tracker
1922 Harley Davidson JD Board Racer at Moto Talbott Museum
1922 Harley Davidson JD Board Racer
Robb Talbott (left), Bobby Weindorf (right)

An Interview with Bobby Weindorf

Imagine if your fulltime job was fettling more than 150 of the world’s most beautiful motorcycles. Welcome to the world of Bobby Weindorf, former factory race mechanic, motorcycle dealer, and ace restorer. Taking care of the prestigious Moto Talbott Museum collection is his fulltime job. We asked him what it’s like.

Q: Do all these motorcycles run?

Weindorf: Yes. I can get anything in here running in 20 minutes or so. There is one bike from China that’s seized, and the Steve McQueen bike is missing a cable and throttle. But it’s my job to make sure all these bikes run!

Q: What are your primary responsibilities at Moto Talbott Museum?

Weindorf: I keep all the bikes running and prep them for shows. And I need to make them correct. When Robb finds a new project, we need to make a decision: should I just make it run? Should I do a cosmetic restoration, or a full mechanical restoration? That depends on how far gone the bike is. And some bikes are left in their original state, to better convey their history and provenance.

We get some bikes that have hokey parts, or are missing things. So I do a lot of research, and get a lot of parts from Italy, Spain, and BMW. With BMW, I spend a lot of time contacting their archive to make sure things are correct.

Q: How did you meet Robb?

Weindorf: Robb came down to southern California to visit another collector I’ve worked for, Guy Webster. Robb said he had an old Husky he wanted restored, and I told him I’d do it. I came up to Carmel, restored that bike. Then he wanted a Vespa restored, and I did that. Then he said he wanted to start a museum, and did I want to move north? So I did.

Q: What are the most typical restoration tasks you perform?

Weindorf: I call it the “Ps”: Paint, polishing, powdercoating, and plating. We don’t have a paint booth, and there is no polisher nearby, so we have to send out for those things. And chromers are getting harder and harder to find. The best chromer in the country, in Kentucky, just closed. I try not to have very many parts powdercoated, but it can be the right choice for the frame and other parts that get banged around a lot.

So often it’s just the little things. Bikes are missing parts, or something small is incorrect. Sometimes I look at a bike with a strange modification or part and think, “What was someone thinking here?”

Q: Do you have to fabricate parts for very old or rare bikes?

Weindorf: Some things will require machining or fabrication, like bronze swingarm bushings. And some bikes have parts that are un-obtain-ium, and you have to figure out how to have them made. If it was a cast part, you’re stuck. Some companies were only in existence for a few years, like the Italian Devil. Where in the hell are you going to find parts for that?

But getting parts has actually gotten easier, thanks to the Internet. Instead of contacting one or two guys that you happen to know, you now have the whole world to look for parts.

Q: Are there problems that are specific to a country or brand?

Weindorf: Every manufacturer is different, and you can definitely see trends among the Germans, the Italians, and the British. But basically, they’re just two wheels and a motor.

Mechanically they’re not too difficult, unless someone blew up the engine. These bikes are pretty bulletproof. The most common thing to fail is wiring. But I love wiring and electrical problems. Old wires fray. Some bikes have specific known issues, like the “slinger” [sludge trap] on old BMWs. If it’s too full, the engine doesn’t get lubrication, and it blows up. So there are things like that, which you know you have to check.

Q: You’ve worked as a mechanic for factory race teams. How does this compare?

Weindorf: Old stuff is good to work on, because it’s so basic. You can get into every part of it—nothing is out of reach. With modern bikes, there are some things that you would never attempt to take apart. Just trying to set valves on modern bike is a headache. With these bikes, if you give me 20 minutes, I’ll have all the valves done. I love the simplicity of old bikes.

New bikes have amazing traction control, and wheelie control, and ABS—but these old bikes in many ways are more enjoyable and accessible. People are intimidated by vintage bikes, but they are really, really easy, once you have a have basic understanding of mechanics and motors. They’re all just variations on a theme. Does it have gas, compression, and a spark? Keeping them running involves checking valves and changing oil. Those are the cheapest insurance measures you can do.

Q: After all these years of wrenching, are you still learning new things?

Weindorf: All these bikes have their special significance and cool factor. We have a BMW R25 with a three-slide carburetor. I thought, “Wow! I’ve never seen that before!” So I took it apart to look at it. It’s wonderful and primitive at the same time.

Q: What do you ride personally?

Weindorf: People like to ask me that! It depends on what day it is. My favorite bikes are whatever is in my garage. There are 30 bikes in there. I just have to decide what I’m doing that day. Some Sundays I’ll ride three different bikes: one to the coffee shop in the morning, another for a lunch ride, and another for a little longer ride. Mostly I rotate between three: my Ducati Multistrada, Moto Guzzi V7, and Honda GB500. I seem to be in a 500 phase. I also have a Triumph 500, a Yamaha RZ500, and a Fiat 500 car. I have a lot of 500 stuff in my life.

I’ve had bigger bikes—my Ducati is big, and I’ve had superbikes, Aprilias, and an MV F4. They’re plenty fast, but I’ll never be able to use all that horsepower on the street. I find the smaller, lighter bikes so much more fun. They give a better illusion of speed. The V7 in the real world is kind of slow and old feeling, but you get the feeling you’re going really fast when you’re doing 50mph! It’s all about how you feel. I could ride my MV and go 140mph—it’s so new and perfect, it doesn’t feel like anything. But you have to be going 140mph! Which is friggin’ crazy….

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